ParaKnot3D Christmas Tree

Print your Christmas tree!

The project is the result of a FLEX internal competition to design the Christmas card for 2017. The idea of „DIY instructions to make a Christmas tree" by Malika Eilers prevailed in the team-internal voting. Drawing heavily on the recently implemented "ParaKnot3D" project, the concept, developed in a sketchy drawing style, focuses step by step on producing a collapsible Christmas tree model from a 3D-printed tree trunk and branches made from green paper straws.

Keywords: 3D-printing, digitization, ParaKnot3D, joint, node, lightweight design, plastics, Christmas greetings

Structure

In terms of a supporting structure, a (coniferous) tree (in the natural environment) represents a framework. The primary supporting element is the trunk - a slender rod that is primarily pressure-stressed by its crown and is held in place in the ground by the root system. The primary supporting element is the trunk - a slender rod that is primarily pressure-stressed by its crown and is held in place in the ground by the root system. Radially oriented, almost horizontally oriented branches grow from it, which act as cantilevers with a rigid connection to the trunk.

Die konstruktive Kernidee des Entwurfs separiert die Baumstruktur in seine primären Elemente: den Stamm und die Äste.

Digitization

The sketch of the draft author (analogue principle) was transferred by Martin Dembski into a digital information structure. The "architecture" of the tree results in the programmed algorithm from the parameters for: number of connectors, order of their arrangement, number of branches per connector, branch angle and diameter of the straws. For the purpose of a resource-efficient construction, the trunk of the tree has been replaced by a straw onto which the annular connectors together with the radially aligned plug-in pins are placed.

Implementation

It was decided to 3d print the trunk, in which the printed material initially forms a "base" in layers, from which it then grows the slender trunk, out of which in a continuous vertical rhythm radially aligned connectors to attach green paper straws of different lengths are formed.

DIY

If you share our enthusiasm for our small project and have a 3D printer at your disposal, you can download the file with the print data here. If you do not have a 3D printer, you do not have to go empty-handed: You are welcome to order your tree trunk here!

Team

processed by:

Martin Dembski, M.Sc.,

Malika Eilers

supervised by:

Prof. Dr.-Ing. Alexander Stahr